According to a YouGov poll commissioned by online distance learning specialist Arden University, almost one in ten UK adults aged 35-54 plan to study for a higher education qualification between now and 2018 – a further 4% have already enrolled.

The study suggests that a more proactive approach to career satisfaction could be behind the surge in mid-life learners, so called ‘Millers’.

For example, only a third of people (33%) aged 45-54 questioned said they were happy with their career and qualifications; one in eight said they were definitely unhappy but felt trapped by not having the right qualifications to make a change.

A significant number of Millers also cite family as the reason they are only now looking to pursue higher education qualifications.

One in ten aged 35-54 who said they are intending to start studying  in the next three years admitted wanting some ‘me’ time, having put off higher education to have a family. Nearly one fifth (19%) said they weren’t happy with the qualifications they’d achieved when they were younger.

Over half (58%) of this age bracket intending to start a higher education qualification by 2018 say want to study as a “personal challenge”.

Dr Philip Hallam, VC & CEO of Arden University, said: “When they were introduced, tuition fee increases hit mature learners very hard – a fact reflected by the *37% drop in part time students we’ve seen over the past five years.

“The results of this poll are therefore encouraging as they show that interest in higher education is growing again among older age brackets that may previously have been deterred. However, intention to study is only part of the equation and higher education providers have a duty to ensure that the right study options are in place to make sure intent become a reality.”

To support those who may be considering returning to learning and studying for a higher education as a mature student, perhaps in order to progress or change their chosen career, Arden University has produced a guide which looks at factors such as course selection, routes to study and financial considerations.

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According to a YouGov poll commissioned by online distance learning specialist Arden University, almost one in ten UK adults aged 35-54 plan to study for a higher education qualification between now and 2018 – a further 4% have already enrolled.

The study suggests that a more proactive approach to career satisfaction could be behind the surge in mid-life learners, so called ‘Millers’.

For example, only a third of people (33%) aged 45-54 questioned said they were happy with their career and qualifications; one in eight said they were definitely unhappy but felt trapped by not having the right qualifications to make a change.

A significant number of Millers also cite family as the reason they are only now looking to pursue higher education qualifications.

 

One in ten aged 35-54 who said they are intending to start studying  in the next three years admitted wanting some ‘me’ time, having put off higher education to have a family. Nearly one fifth (19%) said they weren’t happy with the qualifications they’d achieved when they were younger.

Over half (58%) of this age bracket intending to start a higher education qualification by 2018 say want to study as a “personal challenge”.

Dr Philip Hallam, VC & CEO of Arden University, said: “When they were introduced, tuition fee increases hit mature learners very hard – a fact reflected by the *37% drop in part time students we’ve seen over the past five years.

“The results of this poll are therefore encouraging as they show that interest in higher education is growing again among older age brackets that may previously have been deterred. However, intention to study is only part of the equation and higher education providers have a duty to ensure that the right study options are in place to make sure intent become a reality.”

To support those who may be considering returning to learning and studying for a higher education as a mature student, perhaps in order to progress or change their chosen career, Arden University has produced a guide which looks at factors such as course selection, routes to study and financial considerations. This can be found by visiting the resources section at www.rdi.co.uk.